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Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of School feeding programs in developing countries found in the catalog.

School feeding programs in developing countries

Beryl Levinger

School feeding programs in developing countries

an analysis of actual and potential impact

by Beryl Levinger

  • 303 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Agency for International Development in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • School children -- Food -- Developing countries,
  • Children -- Developing countries -- Nutrition,
  • Nutrition policy -- Developing countries

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Beryl Levinger
    SeriesAID evaluation special study -- no. 30, A.I.D. evaluation special study -- no. 30
    ContributionsUnited States. Agency for International Development. Bureau for Food for Peace and Voluntary Assistance. Office of Program and Management Support, Horace Mann-Lincoln Institute of School Experimentation
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 99, 9 p. ;
    Number of Pages99
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14939192M

    School feeding programs in low- and middle-income countries have been effective in improving the nutrition of the beneficiaries, as well as in boosting school enrollment and attendance rates. The State of Social Safety Nets reported on economies with a school feeding program. These programs not only targeted food-insecure areas, but.   School Feeding Program (SFP) as a social safety net has been popular in developing countries as an instrument for achieving the Millennium Development Goals. These programs are also advocated as important interventions for improving the human capital of school-aged children. The SFP is essential to provide a balanced diet to.

      School feeding programs also go far in directly contributing to multiple MDGs in terms of reducing hunger, increasing universal primary education and eliminating gender disparity. As . 3) and, at the same time, laid out a plan for a pilot to reassess school feeding programs. With a similar motive, in the World Bank and the World Food Programme (WFP) conducted a joint analysis with the title “Rethinking School Feeding,” explicitly acknowledging the need to clarify the underlying issues (Bundy and others ).

    government school feeding programs in the three countries. Sections 5–10 explain the methodology and findings of the baseline survey, including the reality of smallholder farmers, supply chains, food reserves, and social accountability. The report concludes with an analysis of where further work is needed. 1. INTRODUCTION Government school. School feeding program as a social safety net has been popular in developing countries as an instrument for achieving the Millennium Development Goals. These programs are frequently targeted towards populations that are food insecure and reside in areas with high concentrations of families from low socioeconomic status, or towards schools that face poor attendance and enrollment of students.


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School feeding programs in developing countries by Beryl Levinger Download PDF EPUB FB2

School feeding programs (SFPs) are intended to alleviate short-term hunger, improve nutrition and cognition of children, and transfer income to families. Get this from a library. School feeding programs in developing countries: an analysis of actual and potential impact.

[Beryl Levinger; United States. Agency for International Development. Bureau for Food for Peace and Voluntary Assistance. Office of Program, Policy, and Evaluation.; Horace Mann-Lincoln Institute of School Experimentation.].

This sourcebook documents and analyzes a range of government-led school meals programs to provide decision-makers and practitioners worldwide with the knowledge, evidence and good practice they need to strengthen their national school feeding efforts.

The sourcebook includes a compilation of concise and comprehensive country case-studies. The harmony of programs package: Quasi‐experimental evidence on deworming and canteen interventions in rural Senegal. This paper uses a unique and large-scale quasi-experime Azomahou, T., Diallo, F., and Raymond W.

School-feeding programs are popular development assistance programs in developing countries but have previously had few sound, empirical analyses of their effectiveness and costs. Reviewed are empirical studies of relationships among school feeding programs (SFPs), school attendance, enrollment, cognitive development, and academic performance.

Recommendations for SFP design are specified. An agenda for a systematic operations research project on the influence of SFPs on these variables and on nutritional status is described. School feeding Nearly half the world’s schoolchildren, some million, in low- and middle-income countries eat a daily meal at school.

India now feeds more than million children; Brazil 48 million; China 44 million; South Africa and Nigeria each more than 9 million.

School Feeding Programs in Developing Countries By: Hannah Onderko Educational Benefits of SFPs What are School Feeding Programs (SFPs).

School mandated meal programs On-site Breakfast Mid-morning meals Lunch Snacks (fortified high-energy biscuits) Off-site Take-home rations. is a platform for academics to share research papers. In conflict-affected countries, where children are twice as likely to be out of school than their peers in stable countries – times more likely in the case of girls.

The World Food Programme (WFP) has six decades of experience supporting school feeding and health initiatives and working with more than countries to set up sustainable. In order for a country to have an effective school feeding program that focuses their resources on the neediest children, countries must: (a) determine if school feeding is the most effective social safety net option; (b) set program objectives and predicted outcomes, and determine administrative costs; (c) establish a system of effective.

The world is still recovering from the financial and food crises of A key response, especially in developing countries, was to scale up school feeding programs. Popular among many governments, school feeding was seen then (and still is) as a safety net for.

The Global School Feeding Sourcebook: Lessons from 14 Countries examines the 14 national programmes in terms of Five Quality Standards as identified in Rethinking School Feeding (WB, ) that are needed for school feeding programmes to be sustainable and effective.

These standards include: design and implementation; policy and legal frameworks; institutional arrangements; funding and budgeting; and community participation. In many high-income countries, school feeding is an important element of national social protection systems, and – along with other safety nets – an integral part of care for the most vulnerable.

WFP’s support is focused primarily on low-income countries, where school feeding is less well institutionalized: only 30 percent of these.

Global School Feeding Sourcebook: Lessons from 14 countries. About one in five children (nearly million children) receive a meal at school every day, which amounts to a global investment of around US$75 billion per year.

School feeding programs have recently received renewed attention as a policy instrument for achieving the Millennium Development Goals of universal primary education and hunger reduction in developing countries. School feeding also had significant effects on math performance in two RCTs and two CBAs.

Costs of school feeding. We found that in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), the average and median costs of school feeding standardized to kcals combined were US$41 and US$ 30 respectively (n = 62), with large variations across countries.

Though school feeding program seems to be a new phenomenon in our educational context, it goes on in many developing countries with good impact around the globe. In our new education policy this idea has been ingrained. Of course, school feeding activities have been in vogue in some schools in limited areas run by non-government organizations.

School feeding programs are politically popular interventions. They are, nevertheless, difficult to assess in terms of effectiveness since their impact is partially on education and partially on school health.

They are, additionally, a means to augment consumption by vulnerable populations. Downloadable. School feeding program as a social safety net has been popular in developing countries as an instrument for achieving the Millennium Development Goals.

These programs are frequently targeted towards populations that are food insecure and reside in areas with high concentrations of families from low socioeconomic status, or towards schools that face poor. One of the motivations for establishing school feeding programs is to provide targeted families and their children, including girls, an incentive to attend school (Jomaa ).

However, in recent years, the idea of using school feeding programs as a vehicle for agricultural development has also gained momentum.School feeding programs (SFPs) are intended to alleviate short‐term hunger, improve nutrition and cognition of children, and transfer income to families.

The present review explores the impact of SFPs on nutritional, health, and educational outcomes of school‐aged children in developing countries. Schools have been a powerful setting to promote health programs [1, 2].The School Health and Nutrition (SHN) program is a cost-effective intervention for resource-poor countries where more schools and teachers are available than health care institutions and workers [3, 4].Many school-aged children in these countries are affected by treatable and preventable illnesses [3, 4].